Pavilion Architectural Design

Pavilion Architectural Design
Pavilion Architectural Design

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Pavilion Architectural Design

Pavilion in United Arab Emirates for Dubai Expo 2020                            

The complexity involved in contemporary architectural designs or structures and their respective demands usually drive designers and architects to experiment other possibilities that are suitable for development of exhibition pavilions. As a result, according to Alves and Nojimoto (2011) designers and architects endeavor to explore these possibilities in a manner only simulated using the available project development technologies in search for design processes that have compatibility aspect with contemporaneity phenomena. 

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Main Requirements and Theories for Designing the Pavilion               

Pavilions are an essential form of prototypical apparatus or stepping stone for ideas and solutions which have the potential for expansion upon in buildings later (Alves and Nojimoto, 2011). This means that a pavilion can be considered as an aggregation since it enables accumulation of various architectural ingredients or elements which are in proximal interaction and influencing each other, but have not yet been proven as options for perfect synthesis for application in more complex and larger building projects (Alves and Nojimoto, 2011).

In the planning of the pavilion design, it is imperative to note that, pavilions usually have more than one exhibition which is an essential aspect of consideration. The general requirements involved in designing pavilions include:

  • inclusion of an entrance lobby to prevent direct entry into a corridor;
  • the changing and muddy and wet areas need to be separated from any indoor sports or social accommodation;
  • flexibility need to be planned for to easier response to varied levels of female/male users; the circulation routes need to be planned simple and straightforward; access for disabled users need to be provided;
  • a flexible catering and social layout; plan for satisfactory viewing of major playing areas and convenient access to pitches; 
  • security and protection of the pavilion when not occupied must be considered through installation of security systems such as CCTV;
  • and also the pavilion must have adequate external lighting to minimize power usage during the day.

Furthermore, the pavilion will generally be required to have adequate facilities to cater for all the users even when at full capacity. These facilities include: toilets; changing rooms; information area; showers and dry off areas; toilets; officials’ changing rooms; kitchen; club room; souvenir shop; cafeteria and snack bar; cleaner’s store; lobby; disabled toilets; as well as equipment storage rooms (each for sporting and social purposes).

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In this context, the Pavilion in United Arab Emirates for Dubai Expo 2020 will be designed based on a design process which embraces parametric applications, shared creation, digital fabrication as well as interactivity (Mitchell, 2009). Through this approach, the designer or architect will be provided with an opportunity to put into practice theoretical concepts of the Second Order Cybernetics and Complex Systems theory (Alves and Nojimoto, 2011).

In the design process, the concepts of this theory will be used mainly as design criteria guiding the decision-making process throughout the project. These theoretical concepts are very crucial because they ensure that the designer remains attentive and receptive to the surrounding and to its changes, in a manner that allows appropriate reorganization to be timely made in order to ensure the balance of the system is maintained.

The theory is based on systems observation from the perspective of communication, regulation, and control using feedback and loops circularity in order to balance the system and explore a set of possibilities to achieve anticipated goals. Fundamental theoretical concepts such as feedback, loop and responsivity from the theory will be applied in the project design process (Alves and Nojimoto, 2011).

Spaces Programming Chart

 The spaces programming chart the functional areas and/or facilities in the pavilion architectural design include: entrance/reception/information area; waiting or lobby area; showers and changing rooms; toilets (females, males and disabled); officials’ changing rooms; souvenir shop; cafeteria and snack bar; cleaner’s store; common rooms/clubhouse; sitting terraces; as well as sports storage room (for both sporting and social purposes).

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Functional Zoning Bubble Diagrams

Functional Matrix and Spaces Priorities

Spaces Requirements’ Tables

 This provides an overview of how different elements of the pavilion will occupy space, with an emphasis on the space taken up by each element and whenever an element exists in duplicates the occupied space has to be specified. For instance, the different elements specified in the general requirements to be considered before designing the pavilion such as the basic facilities.

However, it is also important to note that the spacing of tables and chairs is determined by a consideration of the area of all spaces with sitting capacities and evaluating the space available against the tentative number of needed chairs and tables. It is also important here to note that some facilities such as the changing rooms, toilets, and showers have to be differentiated according to gender, and also those for the disabled users should also be separated from those of other users in order to ensure that they can easily access them.  The measurements are provided:

SpacesAreaQuantityNet AreaUsers
Pavilion of United Arab Emirates in Dubai Expo 2020
TypicalReception50 m2150 m2Staff & Clients
Lobby Area100 m21100 m2
Souvenir Shop40 m2140 m2
Cafeteria & Snacks50 m2150 m2
Common Rooms100 m22200 m2
ToiletsStaff5 m2210 m2Staff  
Males5 m2420 m2Male Clients
Females5 m2630 m2Female Clients
Disabled10 m2220 m2Disabled Clients
Urinals10 m2220 m2Male Clients
OfficesManager’s office40 m2140 m2Manager
Administrative offices30 m2260 m2Staff
Ticketing office30 m2130 m2Staff
SpecialSoccer Pitch7,000 m217,000 m2Players
LockersMales1 m25050 m2Male Players
Females1 m25050 m2Female Players
Shower & Changing RoomsFemale5 m2945 m2Female Players
Male5 m2945 m2Male Players
Officials5 m2210 m2Teams Officials
Communal20 m25100 m2Clients
Sitting TerracesAdults1200 m211200 m2Clients
Children200 m21200 m2
Disabled90 m2190 m2
Physiotherapy & First Aid Room20 m2120 m2Staff, Clients & Players
Cleaner’s Cupboard or store20 m2120 m2Cleaners
Sports Store100 m21100 m2Staff & Players
Corridors & WalkwaysCorridors20 m210200 m2Staff & Users
Walkways40 m25200 m2Staff & Users
Total10,000 m2

Table 1: Space Requirements Table 

Design Considerations      

The design requirements to be involved in designing the pavilion include:

  • There will be inclusion of an entrance lobby to prevent direct entry into a corridor;
  • The changing and muddy and wet areas need to be separated from any indoor sports or social accommodation;
  • Flexibility need to be planned for to easier response to varied levels of female/male users, and this will be achieved through wide circulation routes that are to be planned simple and straightforward, as well as providing a flexible catering and social layout.
  • Routes for ease access of the pavilion by disabled users will also be provided;
  • The pavilion will be planned to ensure that there is satisfactory viewing of principle or major playing areas and convenient access to pitches;      
  • Security and protection of the pavilion when not occupied will also be considered in the pavilion design through installation of security systems such as CCTV; and

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  • Heating and ventilation requirements are the other important design consideration because good heating and ventilation design is crucial, not only for comfort but also to ensure unwanted health implications to users from outside the Arab world from temperatures that are sometimes extremely high to bear.
  • Therefore, there will be no need of insulation and heating will not be necessarily needed during the day but at nights and only for some people. However, a lot of ventilation will be required in the pavilion to ensure that there is free flow of air. This means that there will be need to provide for cross-ventilation that is efficient in the entire pavilion by fitting grills, air bricks externally on walls as well as large windows.
  • When the pavilion is locked, ventilation will also be enhanced by fitting robust transfer grills or undercut internal doors. In addition, kitchens, toilets in the changing area and shower areas will be fitted with mechanical extracts. Moreover, ceiling and wall mounted fans which are fitted with over-ran and humidstats switches will be used to enhance ventilation.      
  • Lighting fittings will be directly attached to the ceiling or walls to provide a minimum of between 100 and 150 lux throughout the changing block, and the switching should be located in a secure and centralized location.
  • In to provide power, an electrical intake together with a cupboard, and guarded power sockets will be fitted for cleaning equipment in the changing areas. In addition, the main power switch should be located in a corridor and the circuit fitted with a current circuit breaker for residential areas. 

 Heating and ventilation

For sustainability purposes, external lighting will be considered with a link to sensors and time clock in order to minimize power usage during the day. An option for solar panels will also be considered in order to ensure solar power potential which is extremely high in the region is tapped (Alves and Nojimoto, 2011; Mitchell, 2009).                   

References              

Alves, G. M. and Nojimoto, C. (2011). Strings Pavilion: design process, V!RUS, [online] n. 6.

Available at: http://www.nomads.usp.br/virus/virus06/?sec=6&item=2&lang=en  [Accessed 01 April 2016].

Mitchell, M. (2009). Complexity:  A guided tour. New York: Oxford University Press.

Le Corbusier, Creation is a patient search (New York: Praeger, 2010) 90.

F.R.S. Yorke and Frederick Gibberd, The Modern Flat (London: Architectural Press, 1997) 150.

Christian Sumi, “The Immeuble Clarte” in In the footsteps of Le Corbusier, edited by Carlo Palazzolo and Riccardo Vio, 177-178 (New York: Rizzoli, 1991).

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