Why can’t Canadians compete with lower labour cost countries such as India and China?

 

 Why can’t Canadians compete with lower labour cost countries such as India and China?



Economic Term Paper & Topics
Please read these directions carefully as students will be penalized for not following directions.
PURPOSE AND GENERAL DIRECTIONS
ECON-1019 has a required research paper as part of the evaluation process. The purpose is twofold -- first, to demonstrate a student’s ability to synthesize the economic principles taught in the course and apply them to current real world situation and second, to fulfill key Employability Skills requirements found in the CIS, fundamentally, the ability to research, communicate and synthesize one’s thoughts.
On the first purpose, students will discuss through the content of the paper, some of the relevant issues of economics that were learned in class and which are demonstrated in real-world situations. In so doing, students will be required to describe the events and to explicitly demonstrate how it is a relevant example. This will be graded in the “Connections” column of the rubric.
The second purpose is for the student to demonstrate their ability to write at a level consistent with post-secondary education an academic argumentative paper. This part of the paper will generate the most marks for the assignment and will be graded on; Content (25%), Organization (20%) and Style (10%). The foundation of the rubric is the standard WRIT rubric with minor variations to fit the needs of this course.
The essay will be assigned during Week 4, the topics of which the students will pick from a list of available topics or from an individual choice with professor’s approval. It is the intention, but not necessary, that students pick topics that are consistent with their area of study – for example, HR students would pick topics that are relevant to HR. The essay shall be between 1600-1800 words in length and is worth 25% toward the student’s final grade – 5% penalty for each 100 words either over or under the target length.
EVALUATION:
Refer to the details of the Term Paper Rubric for evaluation of the paper and to the detailed comments of “Elements of a good paper” found below in this document. Students should consult with your instructor prior to beginning the paper should you have any questions on the grading format.
Papers must be original work to this term – students cannot use previously written papers for this course or use any paper from any other course, whether current or past. Papers submitted IN WHOLE OR IN PART to any previous course, including ECON-1019, will not be accepted and will be deemed plagiarized if submitted as original work for this term. Plagiarism of other’s work, or using work other than what is assigned for this course in this term, will be considered an Academic Offence and will be given a zero for the work and will be dealt with according to the guidelines under the Academic Policies . If you are unsure of your rights and responsibilities, please refer to the Academic Policies found on the Fanshawe College website. There will be no opportunity for re-writes.
FORMAT
The following format MUST be followed – any element not followed will be deducted 1% per element on the “Instructions” column on the Term Paper rubric.
? Paper must be submitted in either .doc or .pdf formats. Other formats deemed “not submitted”
? Title page with course name and section, student’s name, professor’s name
? Paper must be stapled in the top left corner, without a report cover such as a plastic cover
? The report must be printed in BLACK, on 20lb bond paper (typical photocopy quality paper)
? Paper must be written in 12 pt, Times New Roman font, double spaced
? Paragraphs either indented or double spaced in between paragraphs
? Research must follow APA referencing style
? Paper MUST be written in 3rd person format
? Two versions of paper (FOL online e-copy AND hardcopy) must be included in order to be deemed submitted
SUBMISSION DUE DATE AND FORMATS
The due date of the paper will be provided by your professor – it will generally be due the Friday of Week 12, at
noon. A penalty of 10% per 24hr period will be applied if either of the copies are not submitted on time, to a
maximum of 30%. Papers submitted past three days will not be accepted.. Without both copies of the essay, the
essay will not be graded.
VERY IMPORTANT: Students will be required to submit TWO copies of their work ON TIME and at the correct
location. One will be the FOL designated dropbox, which is solely used for detection of plagiarized or copied work.
A hardcopy of the work shall also be submitted into the physical dropbox, located directly outside the door of the
Business Faculty Boardroom (B2025). It will be emptied at any point beyond the due date, and it cannot be assumed
to be on-time simply because it hasn’t been emptied. It must be in the physical dropbox AND the FOL dropbox by
the due date/time.
CITATIONS
Students are to follow the proper APA format for citations and “Works Cited” or “Bibliography” listings. All “facts”
such as numbers, percentages, lists, theories, etc. that are not your own MUST be properly cited. For ease of
preparation, it is suggested that students write their paper using a version of MS-Word that provides “References”
tabs that will automatically format and organize your citations as you write. If you are unsure how to use this tool,
either YouTube or Google directions. Your paper must not have at least 15% and no more that 30% similarity
when analyzed by Turnitin.com. The minimum of 15% ensures that the student has completed one of the primary
objectives of this assignment – that it be a research paper. Papers above 40% will not be graded , this is because
the student has essentially used the words of others to speak for themselves. Part of research and citation use is
learning to find information that supports or refutes your arguments and explaining in your own words the relevance
of why other’s views are relevant to your interpretations.
ELEMENTS OF A GOOD PAPER:
Examples of good papers are posted on FOL. Good papers are also written solely in the 3rd person format and do not
include personal experiences or anecdotal evidence. Good papers also are void of colloquial or slang language.
Good papers utilize a thesaurus to vary the use of common words (such as “huge”, “nowadays”, etc.) for a more
interesting and convincing read. Good papers are proof read in advance – usually by a trusted individual of the
writer. Good papers are not necessarily written quickly, but all are thoughtfully considered by the writer before they
are written. Good papers are enjoyable to read and are richly rewarded.
Content (25%): The content element of the rubric will be based upon the student’s ability to support their thesis
through three or four strong arguments. The bulk of the score will be based upon the student’s ability to support their
thesis, not necessarily that the support is air-tight and correct. Noting that this course in an introductory economics
course, students may argue their points very well , but may be fundamentally incorrect. Arguing well will be worth
most of the marks – it should be fundamentally correct, but not necessarily absolutely correct.
Organization: (20%): This section shall follow the fundamentals of the WRIT rubric. The paper shall be organized
properly, with the major supporting thesis being argued first, the least relevant being last. The paper must have an
introductory paragraph, with a brief summary of what are the key argument points. Students are to number their
argument points in the introductory . paragraph The body of the paper will detail the each of the arguments in order.
Students must number and start each argument by clearly stating what the argument is in either the first sentence of
the opening paragraph or as heading title. Each of the following paragraphs should have an introductory sentence, a
concluding sentence and a body of sentences supporting the one point it is written about. The first sentence should be
the foundation sentence that supports the key argument. The second sentence supports the firs

ECONOMICS

a. Using Figure (picture is sent customer support email), use points to plot the relationship between the hours tennis (horizontal axis) and the monthly club bill (the vertical axis).

 

 

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Fundamentals of Macroeconomics Paper

Fundamentals of Macroeconomics Paper
Part 1

Describe the following terms in your word.

• Gross domestic product (GDP)
• Real GDP
• Nominal GDP
• Unemployment rate
• Inflation rate
• Interest rate

Part 2

Consider the following examples of economic activities:

• Purchasing of groceries
• Massive layoff of employees
• Decrease in taxes

Describe how each of these activities affects government, households, and businesses. Describe the flow of resources from one entity to another for each activity.

 

Rhetorical Analysis

Rhetorical Analysis

work on creating a well written analysis on; read Sara Palins article regarding economy

The ‘Cap And Tax’ Dead End By Sarah Palin

There is no shortage of threats to our economy. America’s unemployment rate recently hit its highest mark in more than 25 years and is expected to continue climbing. Worries are widespread that even when the economy finally rebounds, the recovery won’t bring jobs. Our nation’s debt is unsustainable, and the federal government’s reach into the private sector is unprecedented.
Unfortunately, many in the national media would rather focus on the personality-driven political gossip of the day than on the gravity of these challenges. So, at risk of disappointing the chattering class, let me make clear what is foremost on my mind and where my focus will be:
I am deeply concerned about President Obama’s cap-and-trade energy plan, and I believe it is an enormous threat to our economy. It would undermine our recovery over the short term and would inflict permanent damage.
American prosperity has always been driven by the steady supply of abundant, affordable energy. Particularly in Alaska, we understand the inherent link between energy and prosperity, energy and opportunity, and energy and security. Consequently, many of us in this huge, energy-rich state recognize that the president’s cap-and-trade energy tax would adversely affect every aspect of the U.S. economy.
There is no denying that as the world becomes more industrialized, we need to reform our energy policy and become less dependent on foreign energy sources. But the answer doesn’t lie in making energy scarcer and more expensive! Those who understand the issue know we can meet our energy needs and environmental challenges without destroying America’s economy.
Job losses are so certain under this new cap-and-tax plan that it includes a provision accommodating newly unemployed workers from the resulting dried-up energy sector, to the tune of $4.2 billion over eight years. So much for creating jobs.
In addition to immediately increasing unemployment in the energy sector, even more American jobs will be threatened by the rising cost of doing business under the cap-and-tax plan. For example, the cost of farming will certainly increase, driving down farm incomes while driving up grocery prices. The costs of manufacturing, warehousing and transportation will also increase.
The ironic beauty in this plan? Soon, even the most ardent liberal will understand supply-side economics.
The Americans hit hardest will be those already struggling to make ends meet. As the president eloquently puts it, their electricity bills will “necessarily skyrocket.” So much for not raising taxes on anyone making less than $250,000 a year.
Even Warren Buffett, an ardent Obama supporter, admitted that under the cap-and-tax scheme, “poor people are going to pay a lot more for electricity.”
We must move in a new direction. We are ripe for economic growth and energy independence if we responsibly tap the resources that God created right underfoot on American soil. Just as important, we have more desire and ability to protect the environment than any foreign nation from which we purchase energy today.
In Alaska, we are progressing on the largest private-sector energy project in history. Our 3,000-mile natural gas pipeline will transport hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of our clean natural gas to hungry markets across America. We can safely drill for U.S. oil offshore and in a tiny, 2,000-acre corner of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge if ever given the go-ahead by Washington bureaucrats.
Of course, Alaska is not the sole source of American energy. Many states have abundant coal, whose essay/impact-technological-competency/">technology is continuously making it into a cleaner energy source. Westerners literally sit on mountains of oil and gas, and every state can consider the possibility of nuclear energy.
We have an important choice to make. Do we want to control our energy supply and its environmental impact? Or, do we want to outsource it to China, Russia and Saudi Arabia? Make no mistake: President Obama’s plan will result in the latter.
For so many reasons, we can’t afford to kill responsible domestic energy production or clobber every American consumer with higher prices.
Can America produce more of its own energy through strategic investments that protect the environment, revive our economy and secure our nation?
Yes, we can. Just not with Barack Obama’s energy cap-and-tax plan.
The writer, a Republican, is governor of Alaska.

MCI (Economic Environment)

MCI (Economic Environment)

Given two economic theories, compare and contrast each theory using the company’s Domestic and Global environments.
1. Using your chosen company’s domestic environment identify its economic environment and compare and contrast it using Rostow and Galbraith
2. Repeat the same for the global environment you have identified.

Case SLP: Macro: Introduction to Macro-Economics: The Big Picture

Case SLP: Macro: Introduction to Macro-Economics: The Big Picture
1. Compare and contrast what policies Keynes and Hayek advocated regarding how the federal government
should manage the economy. (Note: There is no need to include biographical information about their
lives)
2. Explain one real-world event that counters the theories of each of the following: Classical, New
Classical, Keynesian, New Keynesian, and Monetarist.
3. Explain one real-world event that supports the theories of each of the following: Classical, New
Classical, Keynesian, New Keynesian, and Monetarist.
4. You have learned that Keynes and Friedman sharply differed on some basic ideas of how the Federal
government should conduct economic policy. Which of the two economists do you agree with more, and
explain why.

Macro-Economics

Macro-Economics

1. Compare and contrast what policies Keynes and Hayek advocated regarding how the federal government
should manage the economy. (Note: There is no need to include biographical information about their
lives)
2. Explain one real-world event that counters the theories of each of the following: Classical, New
Classical, Keynesian, New Keynesian, and Monetarist.
3. Explain one real-world event that supports the theories of each of the following: Classical, New
Classical, Keynesian, New Keynesian, and Monetarist.
4. You have learned that Keynes and Friedman sharply differed on some basic ideas of how the Federal
government should conduct economic policy. Which of the two economists do you agree with more, and
explain why